"BORSA VINI ITALIANI 2018"

Wine Tasting - Vienna, 27.02.2018
(professionals, by invitation only!)

 

 

 

Logo Foto             
 FOTOS 27.02.2018

PRESSEARTIKEL:

Gastro Das Onlineportal - Vorankündigung

Genuss Magazin - Vorankündigung

Gastro Advertorial

Gastro Das Onlineportal - Nachbericht

Genuss Magazin - Nachbericht
Wein & Co online
Wein & Co Magazin

 

 

                                                                           















    © ICE-Italienische Agentur für Außenhandel Wien

 





 


Exhibitor Catalogue
W I N E S
                                                                                       

Southern Export Plan 2 (PES2)
The Export Plan for Southern Italy N.2, also known as the Southern Export Plan 2 (PES2), is a multi-year programme of initiatives aimed at boosting and enhancing the internationalization of SMEs and the icon of Italian products around the world. It is aimed at products and services provided by enterprises located in less developed regions (Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Apulia and Sicily) and transition regions (Abruzzo, Molise and Sardinia). The Plan is developed by Italy's Ministry of Economic Development (MISE) to comply with the European Commission's National Operational Plan on Enterprises and Competitiveness 2014-2020 (European Regional Development Fund – ERDF). Operational management is undertaken by the Italian Trade Agency (ITA) in partnership with regional institutions and local industrial organizations. The programme revolves around two main types of initiatives: training and coaching within Italy, and promotional activities abroad. In particular, it focuses on micro, small and medium enterprises, startups, consortia, business networks and universities located in this specific geographical area. Many activities are carried out in international markets, such as the countries of the European Union, North America and Asia, in order to facilitate forms of commercial, industrial and technological collaboration between Italian companies and foreign counterparts.


ICE – Italian Trade Agency
Ufficio di Coordinamento Promozione del Made in Italy
Piano Export Sud
pianosud@ice.it
http://www.ice.gov.it/export_sud/export_sud.htm

  

 


ICE presents wine producing companies from Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Puglia, and Sicilia:

Campania's average annual wine production of 185 million litres (ranked 9th region in volume terms) includes 16 per cent DOC/DOCG and 15 per cent IGT. Red wine accounts for 57% of Campania's production. It's become increasingly evident why the ancient Romans admired Campania Felix as the most felicitous of wine regions. Over the last decade, the region of Naples has dramatically improved the quality of its modern wines, now classifying about a third of the production as DOC or IGT. Evidence of the new era is the elevation of three ancient wines to the elite category of DOCG: Taurasi, Fiano di Avellino and Greco di Tufo. The Romans favored the vineyards along the coast north of Naples where Falernian, the most treasured wine of the empire, was grown. They also praised the wines of volcanic Vesuvius and the wooded hills of Avellino. Even earlier, the Greeks had recognized the privileged nature of the place, introducing vines which still stand today in Aglianico, Greco and Falanghina. In Campania a majority of producers strives to make the most of native vines, including an honour roll of "archaeological varieties" which do indeed date back to antiquity. The noblest of red varieties is Aglianico, which makes the red Taurasi, as well as the red Falerno del Massico and others. Greco, a name applied to various vines prominent in the south, reaches heights in Greco di Tufo. Falanghina, which seems to have been the base of the white version of Falernian, has become the region's fastest spreading variety. Campania's DOC zones also include the fabled islands of Capri and Ischia, as well as the recently revived Peninsola Sorrentina and Costa d'Amalfi. The recent region wide IGT of Campania, which applies to red, white and rose' wines and nine native varietals, has rapidly increased the quantity of classified wine from a region that is fast gaining in prestige in Italy and other countries.


CANTINA DEI MONACI

direzione@cantinadeimonaci.it
www.cantinadeimonaci.it

contact: GIANLUCA CARPENITO


ETIKE VINI

erica@etike.it
www.etikevini.it

contact: ALESSANDRO MARCIANO


 

LUNAROSSAVINI

info@viniepassione.it
www.viniepassione.it

contact: MARIO MAZZITELLI

 

VITICOLTORI DE CONCILIIS

info@viticoltorideconciliis.it
www.viticoltorideconciliis.it

contact: LUIGI DE CONCILIIS

 

   
Calabria's average annual production of 47 million litres (ranked as 16th region in volume terms) includes 19 per cent DOC and 13 per cent IGT. Red wine accounts for 89% of Calabria's production. Calabria, which forms the toe of the Italian boot, is a predominantly mountainous region with marked variations in microclimates between the sunny coastal hills along the Ionian and Tyrrhenian seas and the chilly heights of Aspromonte massifs. Two grape varieties of Greek origin dominate – Gaglioppo in red wines and Greco in whites. Calabria's best known wine is Ciro', which grows on low hills along the Ionian coast between the ancient Greek cities of Sybaris and Kroton (Sibari and Crotone today). Local legend has it that Ciro' descended directly from Krimia, the wine Calabrian athletes drank to celebrate victory in an early Olympiad. Lately Ciro' has taken on contemporary touches as new methods of vine-training and temperature-controlled winemaking have diminished the alcoholic strength, making the wine rounder, fuller in fruit and fresher in bouquet. The classic Ciro' is red, which in the Riserva version has the capacity to age beyond a decade from certain vintages. There is also a rosato and a bianco from Greco grapes. Melissa, an adjacent DOC zone, makes red and white wines similar to Ciro', but red wines from the same Gaglioppo grown at higher altitudes such as Pollino, Donnici and Savuto are lighter in body and colour. The dark Greco Nero variety is also used in certain reds of Calabria. Among the whites, the rare Greco di Bianco stands out as an exquisite but increasingly rare sweet wine; from a local variety of Greco, it has a rich, velvety texture with a citrus-like bouquet. The nearly identical Greco di Gerace is a non-DOC wine that carries the ancient place name. From the same area comes Mantonico di Bianco, a Sherry-like amber wine with hints of almond and citrus in bouquet and flavour.


AZIENDA AGRICOLA DIANA

info@aziendaagricoladiana.it
www.aziendaagricoladiana.it

contact: VINCENZO DIANA

 

SPADAFORA 1915

info@cantinespadafora.it
www.cantinespadafora.it

contact: IPPOLITO SPADAFORA

 

AGRICOLA BRIGHA

info@agricolabrigha.com
www.agricolabrigha.com

contact: ALBERTO MENTANA

 

   

Basilicata's average annual wine production is 23 million litres (ranked 18th region in volume terms) of which about 13 per cent is DOC and the rest IGT. Red wine accounts for about 80 per cent of Basilicata's production. Basilicata, also known as Lucania, is a region of arid hills and remote mountains that can be chilly despite their southerly situation. However, this upland climate presents advantages for viticulture, with wines that show enviable aromas and flavours. Basilicata has four DOCs: the classic red Aglianico del Vulture and the appellations of Grottino di Roccanova, Terra dell'Alta Val d'Agri and Matera. Aglianico, one of southern Italy's finest red wines, is rapidly gaining admirers elsewhere, too. Aglianico del Vulture Superiore has been nominated for DOCG status. The Aglianico vine - also the base of Campania's Taurasi - was brought to Basilicata by the Greeks, perhaps as long ago as 600 or 700 BC (the name is derived from Hellenico). Grown on the slopes of the extinct volcano of Monte Vulture, it makes a robust, deep coloured wine from fine vintages that can improve over many years, becoming increasingly refined and complex in flavour. There are also youthful versions of this wine, including semi-sweet, and even some sparkling wines. Grottino di Roccanova DOC has a white of Malvasia and Rosso and Rosato based on Sangiovese, with other varieties. Terra dell'Alta Val d'Agri red and rosé wines are based on Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Matera uses a range of varieties in its six types of wine, including the red Sangiovese, Primitivo and Cabernet Sauvignon and the white Greco Bianco and Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata. IGT: Basilicata. DOC: Aglianico del Vulture, Grottino di Roccanova, Matera, Terre dell'Alta Val d'Agri.


CANTINA IL PASSO

cantinailpasso@gmail.com
www.cantinailpasso.com

contact: MARIA GRIMOLIZZI

 

   

Puglia's average annual wine production of 700 million litres (ranked 2nd region in volume terms) includes about 12 per cent DOC and 19 per cent IGT. Red and Rose' wines account for slightly more than half of Puglia's production. Puglia is now bringing its wines to a new high standard of quality. Knowns as the 'cellar of Italy', it produces wines that have been well known since ancient times (circa 7-8th century B.C.), the time of Magna Graecia. Under the Romans, Apulia wines were exported around the civilised world. In the days of the Renaissance, Lorenzo il Magnifico found them most acceptable, and after the French occupation of Italy, huge quantities were shipped to France. In recent years the region has seen a large-scale renovation of its wine sector. Steady improvement in quality along with an increase in quantity of classified wine (including the six IGT categories) has led to a growing reputation for wines widely appreciated for value abroad. Puglia can be divided roughly in two viticultural sectors by a hypothetical line crossing the region between Brindisi and Taranto. To the north, the terrain consists of plains and rolling hills where the climate is temperate. Dry wines from this area tend to have moderate strength, with impressive fruit, good acidity and ample bouquet. Red wines generally derive from the native Uva di Troia or Bombino Nero, as well as Montepulciano and Sangiovese. White wines are dominated by the Verdeca variety, though Bianco d'Alessano, Malvasia, Trebbiano and Bombino Bianco are also evident. South of the Brindisi – Taranto line lies Salento, a peninsula of low, rolling hills that extends between the Adriatic and Ionian seas to the easternmost point of Italy. Though hot, Salento is not quite torrid, thanks to the play of sea currents and breezes that waft across the Adriatic from the Balkans. Salento's traditional wines were the powerful, inky reds from Primitivo, Negroamaro and Malvasia Nera, but increasing attention is being given to fresher reds and rosés, as well as to some unexpectedly bright and fruity white wines.


CANTINA ATTANASIO

cantinaattanasio@yahoo.it
www.attanasio.wine

contact: CARLO ATTANASIO

 

AZIENDA AGRICOLA GIULIANI VITO

info@vitivinicolagiuliani.com
www.vitivinicolagiuliani.com

contact: VITO DONATO GIULIANI

 

BORGO TURRITO

export@borgoturrito.it
www.borgoturrito.it


contact: SARA MARINACCIO

 

TENUTA VIGLIONE

info@tenutaviglione.it
www.tenutaviglione.it

contact: GIOVANNI ZULLO

 

ROCCO ZAMBRI AZIENDA VINICOLA

info@zambrivini.it
www.zambrivini.it

contact: ROCCO ZAMBRI

 

CANTINE LOSITO

info@cantinelosito.it
www.cantinelosito.it

contact: AURELIA LOSITO

 

SANTI DIMITRI AZ.AGR.

comm@santidimitri.it
www.santidimitri.it

contact: CARLO M. VALLONE

 

VIGNETI REALE

amedeo.reale@vignetireale.it
www.vignetireale.it

contact: AMEDEO REALE

 

VINICOLA MEDITERRANEA SRL

info@vinicolamediterranea.it
www.vinicolamediterranea.it

contact: GIUSEPPE MARANGIO

 

   

Sicily's average annual wine production of 635 million litres (ranked 4th region in volume terms) includes about 4 per cent DOC/DOCG and 25 per cent IGT. White wine accounts for some 70% of Sicily's production. Contrasts are not the least of those things in which Sicily abounds. So perhaps it is not surprising that this ancient island boasts one of Italy's most dynamic wine industries or that a region noted chiefly in the past for strong and often sweet amber Marsala and Moscato has put new emphasis on dry, modern wines – both red and white. Sicily's rising status is reflected in the promotion of Cerasuolo di Vittoria to DOCG. That pale but potent red from Nero d'Avola and Frappato is recognized as Cerasuolo di Vittoria Classico from around the town of Vittoria. A major share of Sicily's DOC production is represented by Marsala, a wine introduced by English merchant traders two centuries ago. The other DOC wine made in quantity is the pale white, bone dry Bianco d'Alcamo, part of the broader Alcamo appellation. Moscato di Pantelleria, from the remote isle off the coast of Tunisia, is among the most esteemed of Italian sweet wines. Malvasia delle Lipari, from the volcanic Aeolian isles, is a dessert wine as exquisite as it is rare. Production of the other traditional DOCs – the dry, red Faro and the sweet Moscatos of Noto and Siracusa – has been slight in recent times, but the volume of premium wines has increased with the addition of DOCs from various parts of the island. The greatest surge in the volume of quality wine has not come with DOC/DOCG – which still represents only about 5% of total production – but with the rapid expansion of IGT, primarily under the region-wide Sicilia appellation. Many fine wines come from native varieties, notably Nero d'Avola (or Calabrese), Nerello Mascalese and Perricone (or Pignatello) among the reds, and Inzolia and Grecanico among the whites. Also prominent are such international varieties as Chardonnays, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah.


AL-CANTÀRA

info@al-cantara.it, gianlucacali@al-cantara.it
www.al-cantara.it


contact: GIANLUCA CALI

 
   
ANTICO FRANTOIO

info@oliovivo.com
www.oliovivo.com

contact: SOFIA LAUMANNO

 

ARINI

arinivini@gmail.com
www.cantinearini.it

contact: VITO ARINI

 

AZIENDA AGR. NOTO

info@aziendaagricolatoto.it
www.aziendaagricolatoto.it

contact: FRANCESCO NOTO

 

STOCCATELLO

renzobarbera@hotmail.it
www.stoccatello.it

contact: RENZO BARBERA

 

AZIENDA AGRICOLA MARZUCO

azienda.marzuco@gmail.com
www.agricolamarzuco.com

contact: GAETANO MARZUCO

 

DELIELLA AZIENDA AGRICOLA

deliella@deliella.it
www.deliella.it

contact: LIA DI CARO

 

FEUDO DISISA

info@vinidisisa.it
www.vinidisisa.it

contact: SAL ROMANO

 

FEUDO SOLARIA

info@feudosolaria.com
www.feudosolaria.com

contact: CARMELO GRASSO

 

FIRRIATO

lucamuscente@firriato.it
www.firriato.it

contact: LUCA MUSCENTE

 

BRUCHICELLO

bruchicello@yahoo.it
www.bruchicello.it

contact: GIOVANNI PALERMO

 

TENUTA BENEDETTA ETNA

info@tenutabenedetta.it
www.tenutabenedetta.it

contact: DANIELE NOLI

 

TENUTA GATTI DI GATTI RUSSO

info@tenutagatti.com
www.tenutagatti.com

contact: NICOLAS GATTI RUSSO

 

TENUTA VALLE DELLE FERLE

info@valledelleferle.it
www.valledelleferle.it

contact: ANDREA ANNINO

 

VIVERA

info@vivera.it
www.vivera.it

contact: LOREDANA VIVERA